>The Promise of Christ (Quote from Jared C Wilson)

>Jesus on the wall of the senior HomeImage by freestone via Flickr

[Jesus] is the promise of salvation, both in his death and in his resurrection. It’s by his death we get to avoid hell, but it’s in his resurrection that we will one day see a glorious redemption from the pains of this world to the wonders of the next. The New Testament calls Christ’s resurrection the firstfruits of more to come. This means that Christ’s resurrection is a promise of our future resurrection. One day, you and I will get to slip out of these physical bodies, but God has promised, through the resurrection of the real person of Jesus Christ, to raise us up, and to fulfill our hopes for a new world where there’s no pain or trouble or grieving or mourning or addictions or abuse or adultery or global warming or carsickness or morning breath. Amen? Isn’t that a hope worth exulting over? Isn’t that a promise worth desperately clinging to in the face of all life may bring us?
Christ’s life is a promise to you–and me–of new life. Christ’s death is a promise to us that death is not in vain. Christ’s resurrection is a promise to us that we will rise up out of the grave one day, and the kingdom we live in spiritually now will one day drown out the kingdoms of this world for all eternity.

Jared C. Wilson, Your Jesus is Too Safe (34-35)

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2 thoughts on “>The Promise of Christ (Quote from Jared C Wilson)

  1. >"One day, you and I will get to slip out of these physical bodies…"But doesn't that DEFY resurrection? If we, like Jesus, will be bodily resurrected, then shouldn't we lay to rest the notion of shedding this mortal coil? The thought of a split spirit/soul and body is not biblical.I like all the rest of this quote, and some might say I'm nitpicking, but good biblical theology demands precision of language.

  2. >I didn't see that as opposed to 1 Cor. 15:51-55 "Listen, I will tell you a mystery! We will not all die, but we will all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed. For this perishable body must put on imperishability, and this mortal body must put on immortality. When this perishable body puts on imperishability, and this mortal body puts on immortality, then the saying that is written will be fulfilled: "Death has been swallowed up in victory." "Where, O death, is your victory? Where, O death, is your sting?"I took him to mean that we are changed, not that we will not be physical. But it's probably worth a follow up question to the author.

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