>The Incarnation — 15

>Nativity 2009 - DJ, Anna, Benjaminphoto © 2009 Texas Bohmans | more info (via: Wylio)

“The divine Son became a Jew; the Almighty appeared on earth as a helpless human baby, unable to do more than lie and stare and wriggle and make noises, needed to be fed and changed and taught to talk like any other child… The more you think about it, the more staggering it gets.”

J.I. Packer

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>The Incarnation — 14

>Ice Nativityphoto © 2006 midiman | more info (via: Wylio)

“The glory of the incarnation is that it presents to our adoring gaze not a humanized God or a deified man, but a true God-man – one who is all that God is and at the same time all that man is: one on whose almighty arm we can rest, and to whose human sympathy we can appeal.”

Benjamin B. Warfield

>The Incarnation — 13

>Nativityphoto © 2009 Liz | more info (via: Wylio)

“Lying at your feet is your dog. Imagine, for the moment, that your dog and every dog is in deep distress. Some of us love dogs very much. If it would help all the dogs in the world to become like men, would you be willing to become a dog? Would you put down your human nature, leave your loved ones, your job, hobbies, your art and literature and music, and choose instead of the intimate communion with your beloved, the poor substitute of looking into the beloved’s face and wagging your tail, unable to smile or speak? Christ by becoming man limited the thing which to Him was the most precious thing in the world; his unhampered, unhindered communion with the Father. “

C.S. Lewis.

>The Incarnation — 12

>Church of the Nativityphoto © 2008 Mohamed Yahya | more info (via: Wylio)

As his “body,” the church, through us, members of the body, the living Christ is always intruding, going where he is not necessarily wanted or expected, taking up space where people did not expect God to be.


In his earthly ministry, Jesus intruded into the homes of sinners. He showed up at a wedding and caused a scene. He came into places of death, where people hardly knew him, and brought forth unexpected life.


Maybe that is one reason people try to keep religion theoretical and spiritual. [But] Christianity is not a “spiritual” religion: it is an incarnational religion. It believes that God has a body, that God takes up space, that God will not remain ethereal and vague, distant and detached.

Barbara Lundblad

>The Incarnation — 9

>Luca della Robbia, The Nativityphoto © 2009 Sharon Mollerus | more info (via: Wylio)


Those who believe in God can never in a way be sure of him again. Once they have seen him in a stable, they can never be sure where he will appear or to what lengths he will go or to what ludicrous depths of self-humiliation he will descend in his wild pursuit of man. If the holiness and the awful power and majesty of God were present in this least auspicious of all events, this birth of a peasant’s child, then there is no place or time so lowly and earthbound but that holiness can be present there too.

And this means that we are never safe, that there is no place where we can hide from God, no place where we are safe from his power to break in two and re-create the human heart, because it is just where he seems most helpless that he is most strong, and just where we least expect him that he comes most fully.

Frederick Buechner, The Hungering Dark (Harper San Francisco, 1985)